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human interaction

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Referenced in

Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions

One of the implicit principles of computer science, as odd as it may sound, is that computation is bad: the underlying directive of any good algorithm is to minimize the labor of thought. When we interact with other people, we present them with computational problems β€” not just explicit requests and demands, but implicit challenges such as interpreting our intentions, our beliefs, and our preferences. It stands to reason, therefore, that a computational understanding of such problems casts light on the nature of human interaction. We can be β€œcomputationally kind” to others by framing issues in terms that make the underlying computational problem easier. This matters because many problems β€” especially social ones, as we’ve seen β€” are intrinsically and inextricably hard.